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Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"




































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1 wilight ±L,aster /Service 
W ay side Inn 




April fifth, Nineteen Hundred Thirty-One 



Processional 

Praise Ye the Father 

Prayer 



Gounod 



Our Christ 
Agnus Dei 



Miss Hopkins 
Robert Cleveland 

Wayside Inn Trio 



Bizet-Kreisler 



Messager 

Martin Moore 



Responsive Reading 

Mr. Boyer -ami Atrclience 

The Holy City 

Stephen Goach and Choir 

Easter Reading 

Miss Hopkins 

Chanson de Fortunio 

Wayside Inn Trio 
He is Risen 

Louis Seligman, Joseph Ochedowski, Earl Stoddard 

Easter Talk 

Mr. Campbell 

Easter Eve Gounod 

Mr. Boyier 

Closing Prayer 

Miss Hopkins 

Recessional 

Holy God We Praise Thy Name 






RESPONSIVE READING 

Reader— When the evening was come, there came a rich man of Arimathea, 
named Joseph, who also himself was Jesus' disciple: 

Assembly— Hz went to Pilate, and begged the body of Jesus. Then Pilate commanded the 
body of Jesus to be delivered. 

Reader — And when Joseph had taken the body, he wrapped it in a clean linen cloth. 

Assembly— -And laid it in his own tomb, which he had hewn out of the rock, and rolled 
a great stone to the door of the sepulchre, and departed. 

Reader— Now the next day, that followed the day of preparation, the chief priests and 
Pharisees came together unto Pilate. 

Assembly—Szymg, Sir, we remember that that deceiver said, while He was yet alive, 
after three days I will rise again. 

Reader — Command, therefore, that the sepulchre be made sure until the third day, lest 
His disciples come by night, and steal Him away, and say unto the people, He is 
risen from the dead: so the last error shall be greater than the first. 

Assembly — Pilate said unto them, You have a watch; go your way, make it as sure as 
ye can. 

Reader — So they went, and made the sepulchre sure, sealing the stone, and setting a watch. 

Assembly — In the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the 
week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre. 

Reader — And, behold, there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended 
from heaven and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it. 

Assembly — Plis countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow. 

Reader — And for fear of him the keepers did shake, and became as dead men. 

Assembly — And the angel answered and said unto the women, Fear not ye: for I know that 
ye seek Jesus, which was crucified. 

Reader — He is not here: for He is risen, as He said. Come, see the place where the Lord 
lay. 

Assembly — And go quickly, and tell His disciples that Pie is risen from the dead; and, 
behold, He goeth before you into Galilee; there shall ye see Him: lo, I have told you. 



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Presents 
THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS 

I N 

the Large Ballroom 

O F 

The Wayside Inn 










April seventeenth, Nineteen Hundred Thirty-one 


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Solomon Dutton House Boys 
Pri seni 

"THE GREAT PUMKIN CASE" 

l; I. S. Denison 



CHARACTERS 



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Vb. Mubb, Defendam 

Tiki Whiffles, chieJ witness for Plaintiff 

and on ner <>i a cow , 

Sam Gump, a w itn< 
\i;i Snooks, a w itnes . 
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Georee Hill 

( Jeorge Johnson 

Arthur Delaney 

Earl Stoddard 

Marvin Webster 

Clifford Moffal 

Robert Wallace 

Ralph Dele^rieco 

Raymond I lahn 

Frank Baker 



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Vlbert Niedbala, Francis Quirk, Carl Hayes, 
John Milanskas, William Laskey, Andrew Jar\i 



S( I \1- : CoURI Room 



Calvin How House Boys 
Present 

"BARGAIN DAY AT BLOOMSTEIN'S" 

\\\ I' d\\ aid Mum ford 



CHARACTERS 



Isaac Blooms ii: in 
Silas Bascom 
Sam Randolph 
Steve Stom: 
Willie Keen 
Birdie O'Neil 
s \iry b ascom 
Nellie Bangs 
Maude Miller 
Miss Stoli 
Miss I Ii vi ik 
Mrs. Keen 
\ [rs. Sharp 
Mrs. Trotter 
Mrs. MrRPHY 



Joseph Ochedowski 

Thomas Hogan 

Robert Cleveland 

John Lindgren 

John Clark 

Louis Seligman 

Charles Barkhouse 

Robert Mc( rinlay 

Andrew ( Jray 

John Lindbergh 

Clifford Muise 

Anthony Crofton 

Joseph Platesik 

William Bridges 

Stephen Gooch 



SCI XI : Third floor of Blooms i i.i \'s Dlpartment Store 



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MONDAY, mmL » 1 


APRIL 20, 1931 <4t3F5f gk 



ROUTES AND TIME SCHEDULE FOR THE RIDES. 

Observance of Patriots' Day, Monday, April 20, 1931. 



DAWES RIDE. 

START 10 A. M. FROM JOHN ELIOT 
SQUARE, ROXBURY. 

Roxbury Crossing, 
under railroad bridge to 

Tremont Street, 

Huntington Avenue, 

Brookline town line, 

Brookline Village, 

Harvard Street, 

Cambridge Street, 
pass Coolidge Corner, 

Edward Devotion School — 
stop— 10.15 A. M. to 10.35 A. M. 

Harvard Street, 
pass Allston railroad station, 
cross bridge, turn left to Lincoln 
Street, 

Franklin Street, 

North Harvard Street, 

pass Stadium, 

halt at Anderson Bridge— 10.50 A. M. 
for Cambridge escort, 

over bridge to 
Boylston Street, 
Cambridge Common — 

stop— 11.05 A. M. to 11.20 A. M. 
Harvard Square, 
Massachusetts Avenue 

(old Concord Road), 
Town Hall, Arlington Center — 

stop— 11.40 A. M. to 11.53 A. M. 

Arlington Centre, 

Massachusetts Avenue, 
turn off left to 

Appleton Street, Arlington Heights, 
Paul Revere Road, 
back to 

Massachusetts Avenue, 
Lexington Green — 12.25 noon. 



REVERE RIDE. 

START 10 A. M. FROM NORTH 
SQUARE, BOSTON. 

Through Prince Street, over Charlestown 
Bridge, 
City Square in Charlestown, 
to Park Street, 
through Warren Street, 

ft 

through Main Street, 
to Sullivan Square. 
Turn left to Cambridge Street, 
to Somerville line at tablet, 
back to Sullivan Square, 
Broadway (Somerville), 
to Foss Park — 
stop — 10.25 A. M. to 10.35 A. M. 

From Foss Park, Broadway over Winter 

Hill, 
passing Paul Revere Park, 
Main Street (Medford), halting at 

Cradock Bridge, 

Through Medford Square, to Captain 
Hall House — 

stop— 10.50 A. M. to 11.15 A. M. 

From Medford, High Street, 
through Winthrop Square, 
Medford Street (Arlington), 
through Massachusetts Avenue, 
to Town Hall, Arlington — 
stop— 11.35 A. M. to 11.50 A. M. 

From Arlington, 
Massachusetts Avenue, 

to Appleton Street (left near Arlington 

Heights), 
Paul Revere Road, 
Massachusetts Avenue, 
to Lexington Green at Flag Staff — 

12.20 no 



A MOUNTED ESCORT is provided for each rider by the 110th Cavalry, Massa- 
chusetts National Guard. The riders who impersonate "Revere" and "Dawes" 
are especially detailed from Troop F for this honor. 

(2) 



A RECORD OF THE MODERN RIDERS. 

The "Paul Revere" of 1916 was Sergt. W. L. Hamilton, Troop C, 1st Cavalry, M. V. 
M.; 1917, James H. Phelan; 1918, Capt. R. S. Harrison, National Lancers; 1919, Lieut. 
F. B. Hunneman, 1st Cavalry, M. S. G.; 1920, Sergt. Harry D. Bishop, 1st Cavalry, M. 
S. G.; 1921, Lieut. Harry D. Bishop, 1st Cavalry, M. S. G.; 1922, Capt. K. E. Duncan, 
Hdq. Troop, 110th Cavalry, M. N. G.; 1923, Sergt. William A. Saunders, Troop B, 110th 
Cavalry, M. N. G.; 1924, Sergt. CarroU F. Austin, Troop A, 110th Cavalry, M. N. G.; 1925, 
Master Sergt. Harold L. Philbrick; 1926, Sergt. Geoffrey F. Clifford, Troop C; 1927, Staff 
Sergeant Alfred Towers, Hdq. Detach.; 1928, Sergt.-Maj. Edwin A. Smith, Hdq. Troop; 1929. 
1st Sergt. George E. Cobb, Troop B; 1930, 1st Sergt. Robert D. Rodes; 1931, 1st Sergt. 
Roscoe L. Cummings, Troop F. 

The "William Dawes" of 1920 was Capt. F. B. Hunneman, 1st Cavalry, M. S. G.; 1921, 
Capt. Walter A. Offutt, 1st Cavalry, M. S. G.; 1922, Lieut. F. M. Meyers, Hdq. Troop, 
110th Cavalry, M. N. G.; 1923, Corp. Roy Goggin, Troop B, 110th Cavalry, M. N. G.; 
1924, Sergt. Joseph W. Fairclough, Troop A, 110th Cavalry, M. N. G.; 1925, Sergt. Harold 
I. Slocomb; 1926, 1st Sergt. George A. Dyarmond, Troop C; 1927, Sergt. Kenneth Ferris, 
Hdq. Detach.; 1928, Staff Sergt. Walter T. McKinley, Hdq. Troop; 1929, Sergt. Ragnar W. 
Benson, Troop B; 1930, Sergt. John Reagan; 1931, Sergt. Joseph Quinlan, Troop F. 

The "Dr. Samuel Prescott" of 1930, who re-enacted the Prescott ride to Concord was 
Sergt. Andrew McKnight. 

Riders and mounted escorts of 1931 are from Troop F, 110th Cavalry, Massachusetts 
National Guard, Capt. Herbert N. O'Dell. 



CITIZENS' PUBLIC CELEBRATIONS ASSOCIATION. 

A permanent organization of interested, public-spirited citizens, organized 1912, for the 
purpose of cooperating with the Mayor of the city and his representatives in planning and 
carrying out official observances of public holidays in a manner that may produce constructive 
results as well as be enjoyable to men, women and children of the community. 

President, John A. Scagna; Vice President, Louis Watson; Treasurer, Henry J. D. 
Small ; Secretary, E. B. Mero. 

Past Presidents.— 1912-13, Frank C. Wood; 1914-21, Addison L. Winship; 1922, 
Frank Leveroni; 1923, Frank Chouteau Brown; 1924, John B. Archibald; 1925, 
James H. Phelan; 1926-7, Edward L. Curran; 1928-9, John J. Keenan; 1930, Joseph 
A. F. O'Neil. 



CITY ANNIVERSARY— MAY 1. 

The anniversary date of the inauguration of the first city government for Boston, 1822' 
will be noted by a city-wide display of the municipal flag, thus marking the 109th anniversary 
of Boston as a city. The Mayor in a notification said: "Each May 1 may be perpetuated 
as the beginning of a new civic year, and the symbol of municipal authority may strengthen 
the bonds of unity and cooperation between the interests, spiritual, industrial and social, 
which must all strive for the progress and betterment of our municipality." 

(3) 




BOSTON. 



Hon. JAMES M. CURLEY, Mayor. 

Edmund L. Dolan, Director of Public Celebrations. 

Stanton R. White, Assistant Director. 

CITY COUNCIL: Joseph McGrath, President; Timothy F. Donovan, Thomas H. 
Green, John I. Fitzgerald, Seth F. Arnold, Laurence Curtis, 2d, Michael J. 
Mahoney, William G. Lynch, John F. Dowd, Richard D. Gleason, Leo F. Power, 
Edward L. Englert, Herman L. Bush, Israel Ruby, Francis E. Kelly, Albert L. 
Fish, Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., Clement A. Norton, Peter A. Murray, Joseph 
P. Cox, James Hein, Edward M. Gallagher. 

PATRIOTS' DAY COMMITTEE of Citizens' Public Celebrations Association: 
John B. Archibald, Chairman; Henry F. Brennan, Frank Chouteau Brown, 
John A. Farley, Henry I. Lazarus, Frank Leveroni, John H. Noonan, Joseph 
A. F. O'Neil, James H. Phelan, Henry J. D. Small, Frederick J. Soule; John A. 
Scanga, President, and E. B. Mero, Secretary. Chairman for North End, Felix 
A. Marcella; Chairman for Roxbury, Lawrence J. Lewis. 



The arranged program has as the central element the 16th annual reenactment of the 
"Ride of Paul Revere," and the 12th annual reproduction of the "Ride of William Dawes, Jr," 
in cooperation with the several towns and cities through which the riders proceed on horseback. 



LANTERNS will be hung in the belfrey of Old North Church the evening of 
Saturday, April 18th, as is the annual custom, indicating the method by which 
Revere was notified of the time to begin his ride from the opposite Charlestown 
shore. A church service will be held at 7.45 o'clock. 



THE BELL in King's Chapel will be rung at 9 A. M. Patriots' Day, April 20th. 
This bell was recast in 1816 at the Boston foundry of " Paul Revere and His Son," 
as recorded by inscription now on the bell, which was originallv cast in England 
in 1772. 



BOSTON PROGRAM. 



MONDAY, APRIL 20, 1931. 

9.00 A. M.— FLAG RAISING at City Hall; the national flag by his Honor, the Mayor 
of the city; and the municipal flag by the Chairman of the citizens' committee. 

9.15 A. M.— START OF PARADE TO NORTH SQUARE, Marshal, J. Frank Travers. 

9.45 A. M.— Arrival at North Square. (See program on page 5.) 

10.00 A. M.— START OF REPRODUCTION OF "RIDE OF PAUL REVERE." (See 
route and time schedule on page 2.) 



9.00 A. M.- PATRIOTIC PROGRAM at Eliot Square, Roxbury. (See program on 
page 6.) 
10.00 A. M.— START OF REPRODUCTION OF "RIDE OF WILLIAM DAWES, Jr." 
(See route and time schedule on page 2.) 

(4) 



BOSTON PROGRAM (Continued). 

ROUTE OF PARADE. 

From City Hall via School Street, to Washington Street, to Hanover Street. 
Dedication of Bulfinch Memorial Tablet on St. Stephen's Church, Hanover Street. 

Unveiling ceremony and presentation of tablet to the City by the Commission on 

Marking Historical Sites. 
Parade resumes march by way of Prince Street to North Square — arriving at 9.45 A. M. 



ORDER OF PARADE. 

Marshal. 

U. S. Navy Battalion and Band. 

Veterans of the Grand Army. 

Kearsarge Naval Veterans. 

The Mayor and Committee. 

Spanish War Veterans. 

American Legion. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Colonial Organizations by representatives. 

High School Cadets battalion with band. 

Girl Scout troop with drum corps. 

Boy Scout troop. 

St. Joseph Cadets. 



PROGRAM AT NORTH END. 

Featuring Sixteenth Annual Reproduction of the RIDE OF PAUL REVERE. 
COMMITTEE representing Local, Civic and Patriotic Organizations: 

Chairman, Felix A. Marcella; Secretary, Dr. Frank M. Leonardi; Marshal, 
John DeCicco, Commander V. F. W., North End Post 144. 



8.45 A. M.— ASSEMBLY OF PARTICIPANTS on Hanover Street, corner of Cross 
Street. 182d Regiment Infantry Band; North End Citizens Committee; North 
End Post, V. F. W. ; Massachusetts Nautical Training School; Michelangelo Junior 
High School Cadets and Band; American Legion and Auxiliary; Boy Scouts of 
America, P. C. Disario, Scout Master; English High School Cadets and Band; 
Italian Columbus Society; Ligure Society, and Italian Legion (Ex Combattenti) 
9.00 A. M. — Parade to North Square. 

9.30 A. M. — Exercises, presentation of flags to children and singing of "America". 
9.45 A. M. — Arrival of Parade and "Paul Revere" rider with escort from City Hall. 
9.50 A. M. — Address by His Honor James M. Curley, Mayor of Boston. 
10.00 A. M. — ■ Presentation of Message to rider by the Mayor, and departure of "Paul Revere" 
to Lexington. 

START OF RIDE, from original house which was the home of Revere. Rider 
on horseback in dress of period. 
10.10 A. M. — LOCAL PROGRAM resumed after departure of rider. 

10.15 A. M. — -Formation of parade and march to Commercial Street for unveiling of tablet 

and address by Paul C. Wolman, National Commander, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

10.30 A. M. — Formation of parade and march to Copps Hill, Hull Street, where graves of 

patriots will be decorated. 
10.40 A. M. — Closing exercises at Headquarters of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, North End 
Post 144, at 196 Hanover Street. 

(5) 



ROXBURY. 



COMMITTEE: Lawrence J. Lewis, Chairman; Rev. Charles L. Page, First Vice* 
Chairman; R. George Sheldon, Second Vice=Chairman ; Mrs. John H. Glenn, Secre= 
tary; Representative on General Patriots' Day City Committee— Frederick J. 
Soule. 



ORGANIZATIONS represented on Committee: Roxbury Post 44, American 
Legion; Roxbury Historical Society; Mahoney-Roxbury Post 457, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars; DeNormandie Women's Club; Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts op America; 
Daughters of Union Veterans of Civil War, Tent 29; Grand Army of the Republic, 
Posts 2 and 26; John Eliot Chapter, Unitarian Laymen's League; Junior Moose Lodge 
43; Massachusetts State Guard Veterans' Association, Unit 1; Mothers' and Home 
Makers' Club; Mt. Pleasant Improvement Association; Norfolk House Center; 
Norfolk House Mothers' Club; Norfolk Young Men's Association; North American 
Civic League for Immigrants; Patriot Dames; Roxbury Board of Trade; Roxbury 
Civic League and Improvement Society; Roxbury Neighborhood House; Roxbury 
Post 44, American Legion Auxiliary; Roxbury School Center; United Spanish War 
Veterans, John E. Riley Camp 53, Roger Wolcott Camp 23, Roxbury Camp 13; 
Catherine L. Crane Auxiliary 2; Whitten Auxiliary 29; Roger Wolcott Auxiliary 22; 
Winnesimmett Veteran Firemen's Association and Auxiliary Women in Council. 

EXERCISES AT JOHN ELIOT SQUARE. 8.45 A. M. to 11 A. M. 
8.45 A. M — Concert by Band. 
9.00 A. M — Flag Ceremonies: 

Flag Raising: Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. 

Pledge of Allegiance to Flag: School Children led by F. X. McLaughlin. 

Military Salute: Massachusetts State Guard Veterans' Association. 

"Columbia the Gem of the Ocean," sung by Mrs. Malcolm Duffee. Children will join 
in chorus, waving flags. 
9.10 A. M. — Patriotic program from balcony of Norfolk House Center. 

Greetings of Norfolk House Center, B. Farnham Smith, 



^resident. 

Welcome: Chairman Lawrence J. Lewis. 
Invocation: Rev. Charles L. Page 

Greetings of the City: Henry F. Brennan, Citizens' Public Celebrations Association. 
"American Hymn," sung by N. Y. M. A. Glee Club, William H. Reed, leader. 
Greetings of the Commonwealth: His Excellency Governor Joseph B. Ely. 
"America," by Mrs. Malcolm Duffee. 
Presentation of Paul C. Wolman, National Commander, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and 

Richard S. Paul, Commander, American Legion, Department of Massachusetts. 
Poem: "William Dawes' Ride," recited by George Dakin, written by Donald Sullivan, 

Grade V, Dudley School. 
Historical Sketch: recited by Walter N. Epstein, Public Latin School. 
Introduction of the Rider impersonating William Dawes, Jr. > 
"God of the Nation," sung by N. Y. M. A. Glee Club. 
Address: P. Nicholas Petrocelh. 
"America the Beautiful," Mrs. Malcolm Duffee. 
9.55 A. M — Presentation of Dispatch to the Rider by James F. Cleary, Massachusetts 
State Guard Veterans' Association. 
10.00 A. M— Start of the Ride of William Dawes, Jr., on his way to Lexington. 

Halt at Mission Church while chimes play "Star-Spangled Banner." 
10.05 A. M— Sixth Annual Novice Road Race, arranged by Norfolk Young Men's Asso- 
ciation, Arthur McElwain, Chairman. Official Starter, "Jack" Sharkey. 
10.10 A. M. — Band music and informal addresses. 

10.40 A. M.— Presentation of Trophies: Hon. James M. Curley, Mayor of Boston, and donors 
11.00 A. M.— "The Star-Spangled Banner." 

(6) 



ARLINGTON. 



SELECTMEN: Hollis M. Gott, Chairman; William O. Hauser, Arthur P. Wyman. 

COMMITTEE: Chairman, D. A. Wilcox, Commander of Post No. 39, American 
Legion; Mrs. Eugene R. Vinal, Regent, Daughters of the American Revolution; Henry 
Moore, Commander, Francis V. Marsh, Camp 45, Sons of Veterans; Frank L. Zelck, 
Spanish War Veterans; Paul H. Hevger, Commander of Post No. 1775, Veterans of 
Foreign Wars of U. S.; Richard W. Mellen, Executive, Sachem Council, Boy Scoutsof 
America; Mrs. R. B. Parmenter, Commissioner, and Mrs. Herman Gammons, Deputy 
Commissioner of Girl Scouts of America. 



Band Concert on steps of Robbins Memorial Town Hall from 11 A. M. to 12 Noon. 
9.00 A. M. — Column consisting of detachment from Post No. 39 American Legion, Post 
No. 1775 Veterans of Foreign Wars, Women's Relief Corps, Post No. 36, Daughters 
of Union Veterans, Auxiliary Camp No. 45, Sons of Veterans, Arlington Girl Scouts, 
Boy Scouts of America will form on Academy Street and march to the Central Fire 
Station, which will be dedicated at this time, and the column will then reform and 
march to the burying ground on Pleasant Street, where at the monument to the 
soldiers of the American Revolution a salute will be fired followed by an appropriate 
address by Rev. John Nicol Mark. Following the address Taps will be sounded 
by buglers of the Girl Scouts and the Boy Scouts. 
The column will then proceed up Massachusetts Avenue to the new High School to par- 
ticipate in the laying of the corner stone. The parade will then march down Massa- 
chusetts Avenue and pass in review before the Town Officials and their guests at the 
Robbins Memorial Town Hall. 

11.35 A. M. — Reception to riders, "Paul Revere" and "William Dawes, Jr.," by the Town 
Officials and Francis Gould Post No. 36, Grand Army of the Republic. Menotomy 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, will serve refreshments to the 
riders and their escorts. 
8.00 P. M. — Colonial Military Ball at Robbins Memorial Town Hall sponsored by the 
Board of Selectmen. Ives Band will render a concert from 8 to 9, and will play for 
dancing from 9 till 1.* Grand march at 10 P. M. Program under the direction 
of American Legion, Dr. Arthur H. Ring, Chairman of the Committee. 

* The minuet given at Colonel Isaac Royall's ball on the evening of April 19, 1775, will be 
re-enacted in costume during the evening. 



CONCORD. 



This town arranges for special observance of Patriots' Day every five years, as last year, 
when the ride of Prescott was reproduced; also dedication exercises of the Concord Anti- 
quarian Society. This year only local events are scheduled as follows: 

Morning and afternoon salutes of twenty-one guns by Concord Independent Battery 
and ringing of church bells at sunrise, noon and sunset. 

10.00 A. M. — Track meet — Medford High School vs. Concord High School. 
2.00 P. M. — ■ Antiquarian House open for second season. Tea, 4 to 6 P. M. 
2.30 P. M. — Band concert — Emerson Playground. 

3.00 P. M. — Baseball — Concord High School vs. Middlesex High School. 

(7) 



CAMBRIDGE. 



Hon. Richard M. Russell, Mayor. 

COMMITTEE: Stephen P. Bachosz, Chairman; Francis J. O'Reilly, Alonzo 
Adams, George Cotter, and Ralph W. Robart. 



10 00 A. M.— PARADE starts from City Hall to Harvard Square. Grand Army of the 
Republic, Spanish War Veterans, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
members of Veteran Auxiliaries, and Boy Scouts, Cambridge Post No. 27 American 
Legion Band. 
10.30 A. M— EXERCISES in Harvard Square. 
Music by Cambridge Post Band. 

Address by His Honor, Mayor Richard M. Russell of Cambridge. 
Music by Cambridge Post Band. 

Address by Joseph McElroy, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
Music by Cambridge Post Band. 

Address by Jeremiah J. O'Connor, President of City Council. 
Reception to "William Dawes, Jr.," and escort. 
Singing of "Star-Spangled Banner." 
11.20 A. M — DEPARTURE of "Dawes" to Arlington. 



BROOKLINE. 



COMMITTEE: Fred B. Richardson, Chairman; William O. Comstock, Dr. 
Francis P. Denny, Charles H. Stearns, Charles F. White, Walter D. Allen, Miss H. 
Alma Cummings, Mrs. George H. Wright, Mrs. Walter M. Lincoln, Miss Ema W. 
Burt, Mrs. Gilbert C. Brown, Jr., Miss Maude Bronson. 

SELECTMEN: Daniel A. Rollins, Chairman; Philip G. Bowker, Theodore G. 
Bremer, Walter J. Cusick, William J. Hickey, Jr. 

10.05 A. M. — The rider representing William Dawes, Jr., will be met at the town line at the 
Parkway by an escort and conducted to the Edward Devotion Historical House 
and School, Harvard Street, where he will be received by the committee and other 
town representatives. The rider is scheduled to pass through Brookline Village at 
10.10, Coolidge Corner (via Harvard Street) a few minutes later, and arrive at 
Edward Devotion House and School at 10.20 A. M., where refreshments will be 
served to the rider and his personal mounted escort. 

10.35 A. M. — -Resume ride to Boston Line, Allston; due there at 10.38 A. M. 



SOMERVILLE. 

Hon. John J. Murphy, Mayor. 

COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN: Elmer F. Walsh, Chairman; 
John J. Crowley, John M. Grattan, Leo B. Havican, Warren A. Perry, Arthur G. 
Pearson. 

9.30 A. M. — -The several organizations participating will assemble at Paul Revere Park at 
Broadway and Main Street, Winter Hill, and proceed under police escort through 
Broadway to Saxton C. Foss Park on Broadway, accompanied by the Somerville High 
School Band, the Northeastern Junior High School Band and Knights of the Sacred 
Heart Fife and Drum Corps. 

10.00 A. M. — Patriotic Exercises at Saxton C. Foss Park with appropriate music. 

Somerville High School Band, Northeastern Junior High School Band and the Knights 
of the Sacred Heart Fife and Drum Corps. 
10.20 A. M — Arrival of "Paul Revere" and escort depicting the famous ride of April 19, 1775. 
Reception to the "Rider" by Mayor Murphy, with members of the City Government and 
citizens. 

10.30 A. M — The placing of flowers on the "Paul Revere" tablet by Mayor Murphy. 
10.30 A. M — Departure of "Paul Revere" and escort for Medford. 

10.35 A. M — Medals to be awarded to boys of the Citizens' Military Training Camp by His 
Honor the Mayor, John J. Murphy. 

(8) 



LEXINGTON. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN: Robert P. Trask, Chairman; Hallie C. Blake, 
Theodore A. Custance, Dr. Clarence Shannon, John E. Gilcreast. 

COMMITTEE: Maj. Edward L. Child, Chairman; Arthur F. Tucker, Eugene 
E. Loupret, George M. Davis, Secretary. 

Chief Marshal: Capt. Irving B. Pierce. 

Subcommittees: Randall B. Houghton, President Lexington Historical Society; 
Edward W. Taylor, Chief Fire Department; Irving Sherwood, Sports; William S. Scamman, 
Decorations. 

Reception Committee: Lexington Minute Men — Capt. Ezra F. Breed, Commanding. 
Girl Scout Commission — Mrs. Clara B. Ballard. 
Boy Scout Executive — Bancroft Beatley. 

Chairman Civics Committee, Lexington Boy Scouts — Albert A. Ross. 
Buglers: Martha Nichols, Marjory Duffy, William Mulliken, Maxwell Minen. 
Colonial Representatives: Mrs. Charles M. Collins, Rev. Arthur F. Tucker. 
Traffic: James J. Sullivan, Chief of Police. 

Judges — -After Exercises: Girl Scout Drum Corps Competition, Mrs. Walton S. Red- 
field, Mrs. Louis Crone, Capt. Irving B. Pierce. 



PROGRAM. 

Sunday, April 19. 

8.15 P. M., — Cary Memorial Hall — Annual Commemorative Services of Lexington His- 
torical Society — Address by Walter Pritchard Eaton on "The Destiny of a New 
England Town." Music by Pilgrim Male Quartet. 

Monday, April 20. 

12.00 MIDNIGHT — "Paul Revere" (impersonated by Robert Milam) enters Lexington and 
rides over the historical route to the Hancock-Clarke House, where he arouses the 
occupants, Parson Clarke, impersonated by Rev. C. W. Collier, and Dorothy Quincy 
by Miss Susan Muzzey; from thence on to Concord, stopping at historical points 
to give the alarm. At 12.15 long roll on drums and gathering of Minute Men. 
Fire whistles will blow 1-7-7-5 and church bells will ring. The Common will be 
illuminated with red fire. 
6.30 A. M. — Lexington Boy and Girl Scouts, led by Girl Scout Drum and Bugle Corps, 
will march from East Lexington to the Green at Lexington Center, where, with 
appropriate exercises, they will hoist and break out the flag of the United States 
of America. Services at flagpole in charge of Howard S. O. Nichols. 
9.30 A. M.— MORNING PARADE will form on the grounds at the Adams School in 
East Lexington. 

10.00 A. M. — Start of the parade. Route: Massachusetts Avenue to Battle Green, to 
Monument on the Green, where the Minute Men who were killed in the engage- 
ment are buried; Massachusetts Avenue to Parker Field where the parade will be 
dismissed. 

11.00A.M. — Representatives of the Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
will place a wreath on the monument. Volley fire by the Stanley Hill Post 38, 
American Legion, after which "Taps" will be sounded from North, South, East 
and West by the Girl and Boy Scout buglers. 

12.00 NOON.— Fire whistle will blow 1-7-7-5. 

12.15 P. M— Arrival of "Paul Revere." 

12.25 P. M— Arrival of "William Dawes, Jr." 

Each with an escort of Cavalry from Boston. Riders will be received by Capt. Ezra F. 
Breed, Commander of the Lexington Minute Men, and the Board of Selectmen at 
Captain Parker's statue. 

(9) 



2.00 P. M .— Flight formation of airplanes representing the United States Army, United 

States Reserve and National Guard Air Corps of Massachusetts will pass over and 

drop flowers on the Battle Field. 
2.15 P. M — Competitive drill and parade of Girl Scout Drum Corps, with drum and bugle 

selections of 8-minute duration by each corps for a silver trophy cup to be presented 

by the Town of Lexington to the best all-round corps. 
3.00 P. M .— Baseball game at Parker Field; Lexington High School vs. Lexington Minute 

Boys. 
3.30 P. M — Presentation of a captured German field piece to the Town of Lexington by 

the United States War Department through its representative, Col. Wilson B. 

Burtt of the United States Army. 
Sunset service at the flagpole on the Battle Green by Boy Scout Troops, when retreat 

will be blown by buglers and colors lowered. 
8.00 P. M — Military Ball given by Stanley Hill Post 38, American Legion, in Cary Memorial 

Hall. 



MEDFORD. 



Hon. Edward H. Larkin, Mayor. 

CITIZENS' COMMITTEE: Major John J. Carew, Chairman; Charles T. Daly, 
Secretary. 

Committee includes representatives of Medford war veterans, patriotic, fraternal, 
civic, social, junior, school, church, business and service club organizations of the 
City of Medford. 

Saturday, April 11. 

10.00 A. M. — Placing and dedication of markers: Site of First Meeting House (1696) at High 
Street and High Street Place; Site of Second Meeting House (1726) High Street, 
near Meetinghouse Brook. Auspices of Medford Historical Society, assisted by 
Medford Boy and Girl Scouts. Speaker, Mrs. Richard B. Coolidge, President of 
Medford Historical Society. 
Wednesday, April 15. 

8.00 P. M. — Reproduction of April 15, 1696, Medford town meeting by members of church 
at First Parish Unitarian Church parish house hall, Powderhouse Road (near High 
Street). Auspices of Medford Historical Society. 
Friday, April 17. — Patriotic exercises, tableaux and addresses in the schools. 
Sunday, April 19. — Religious services commemorative of Patriots' Day in the churches. 
Monday, April 20. 

8.00 A. M. — Ringing of church bells for fifteen minutes. 

8.50 A. M.— Formation of parade on High Street at St. Joseph's Church grounds. Head- 
quarters at Armory of Lawrence Light Guard. Commander George L. Stokell, 
Samuel C. Lawrence Post 66, G. A. R., Chief Marshal. 
Route of Parade: Start at Minute Men Memorial, High Street at Public Library to 
Governor Winthrop Square, Winthrop Street, South Street, Main Street over Gover- 
nor Matthew Cradock Bridge (1637), to Medford Square, Riverside Avenue, River 
Street to Salem Street Revolutionary Burying Ground; thence after exercises via 
Salem, Ashland and Water Streets (marching past site of the camp and hospital of 
Gen. John Stark's New Hampshire brigade of Revolutionary soldiers who fought at 
Bunker Hill, located off Water Street) to Forest Street, thence to Medford Square 
and High Street to Governors Avenue. 
Parade reviewed by Mayor Larkin, the Chief Marshal, Guests and Patriots' Day Com- 

mittee in Medford Square, facing the City Building. 
Paraders will later assemble along High Street, between Medford Square and the Armory, 
for exercises and reception to the Paul Revere rider following his stop at the Capt. 
Isaac Hall house. 

(10) 



8.55 A. M. — Liberty Flag Ceremonies, Raising of 13-Star Betsy Ross flag on flagpole, near 

Minute Men of 1775 Memorial, Public Library grounds, High Street and Hillside 

Avenue. Auspices of Grand Army, Spanish and World War Veterans of the city, 

assisted by patriotic organizations. 

Music by Medford Post 1012, Veterans of Foreign Wars Band and Medford Post 45, 

American Legion Drum and Bugle Corps, including "To the Colors." 
Salute to the flag by the assemblage. 

Decoration of Memorial bearing a bronze tablet set in the face of large Pasture Hill 
granite boulder on Library Lawn, by Sarah Bradlee Fulton Chapter, Daughters of 
the American Revolution, Mayor Larkin on behalf of the City of Medford, the 
Lawrence Light Guard, Co. E, 101st Engineers, Massachusetts N. G., Medford 
Lodge of Elks, Medford Allied Veterans' Committee, Medford Boy and Girl Scouts, 
Medford Branch League of Women Voters. 
Ceremony concludes with "Star-Spangled Banner" as the parade forms on High Street. 
Miss Marie E. Simmons, will play the national anthem on the memorial chimes of 
St. Joseph's church, as the parade starts. 
9.00 A. M. — Start of parade. Police escort; Chief Marshal and staff; Patriots' Day Citizens' 
Committee; Medford Post Veterans of Foreign Wars Band, Gerald Frazee, leader; 
Lawrence Light Guard, Massachusetts N. G., Capt. George H. Lenox (in dress 
uniforms); Mayor Edward H. Larkin and City Government; Delegation of Samuel 
C. Lawrence Post 66, G. A. R., with colors; Gen. Samuel C. Lawrence Camp 30, 
United Spanish War Veterans and colors, Commander John H. Miller; members of 
visiting camps of United Spanish War Veterans and colors; Medford Post American 
Legion and colors with Drum and Bugle Corps, Commander Charles M. Doherty; 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, Commander J. C. Marchant; auxiliary and patriotic 
organizations with colors, escorting delegation and colors of Sarah Bradlee Fulton 
Chapter, D. A. R.; Medford High School Band; St. Joseph's Girls' Club; St. Joseph's 
Parish Boys' Band; St. Joseph's Parish Boys' organization; Medford Council Boy 
Scouts with drum and bugle corps; Medford Council Girl Scouts with drum and 
bugle corps. 
Parade may be shortened in case of stormy weather and exercises held in the Armory, 

preceding the parade to the Salem Street Burying Ground. 
Parking of all autos and other vehicles prohibited along the route of the parade from 
8 A. M. to noon. 
9.30-10.00 A. M. — Patriotic exercises and decoration of graves of Revolutionary soldiers of 
Massachusetts and New Hampshire at Salem Street Burying Ground (1683); monu- 
ment over grave of Gov. John Brooks; tomb of Capt. Isaac Hall of Medford Minute 
Men of 1775; grave of Sarah Bradlee Fulton, Medford's Revolutionary heroine; 
and memorial tablet at base of flagpole, erected in 1930 by the City of Medford in 
memory of the Revolutionary dead of Massachusetts and New Hampshire who lie 
in unmarked graves. 
Decoration of graves and memorials by members of Sarah Bradlee Fulton Chapter 
D. A. R., with laurel wreaths and Betsy Ross flag, assisted by Boy and Girl Scouts, 
delegations of War Veterans, women's and patriotic organizations of the city. Mrs. 
Olive L. Hinckley, Regent. Charles T. Daly, chairman at exercises. Prayer by 
Rev. C. Harry Atkinson, pastor of First Baptist church. Address by Hon. Richard 
B. Coolidge. Music by Medford Post V. F. W. Band. 
Salute of three rifle volleys to the Revolutionary War heroes by Co. E, 101st Engineers, 
Massachusetts N. G. Sounding of Taps by buglers. Exercises will be concluded by 
the national anthem. 
10.35 A. M. — Paul Revere rider and escort of cavalrymen arrival at Medford-Somerville line, 
near Winter Hill. Delegation meets rider, escorting him through the city. 
Chimes on Goddard Chapel at Tufts College will be rung while the rider is passing 
through the city, via Main Street to Medford Square, over the Paul Revere route, 
up High Street, to Capt. Isaac Hall House, and later through West Medford to 
Arlington. 

(11) 



10.40 A. M — Paul Revere greeted by South Medford school children assembled at the 
Tufts Schoolhouse grounds, South Medford. Members of Medford Lodge, Sons of 
Italy, will assist at exercises and will present flags to the school children. 

10.50 A. M— Rider arrives at Captain House, after crossing Cradock Bridge into 
Medford Square. Paul Revere on his ride of April 18-19, 1775, aroused Captain 
Hall of the Minute Men of Medford shortly after midnight at the Hall House and 
notified him that the British were coming. The Paul Revere rider will re-enact the 
scene of the notification. The rider will be received by descendants of Captain 
Hall, the Citizens' Committee, Mayor Larkin, the veteran and patriotic organi- 
zations and school children with appropriate exercises, community singing, and 
music by the band. Recitation of Longfellow's poem, "Paul Revere 's Ride," by 
High School senior class pupil. 

11.00 A. M — Reading of message carried by the rider. Address, Mayor Edward H. Larkin. 
Oration. Edward J. Gaffey of the Medford Historical Society will preside. 
Through the courtesy of Mr. and Mrs. Gaffey, the Hall House, around which center the 
principal exercises of the holiday, will be opened for the reception of the rider, as in 
the past years of Paul Revere's ride through Medford. The house will be decorated 
with buff and blue and will fly the 13-star Betsy Ross flag. A bronze tablet, set on 
granite stone, was erected by the Massachusetts Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, in June, 1905, to mark the historical importance of the house. 
11.05 A. M. — Departure of Paul Revere rider, for Arlington, via High Street, with escort. 
Chimes on Grace Episcopal Church will ring as rider gallops up High Street on his 
way to West Medford. 
11.20 A. M. — Rider greeted at West Medford Square, on High Street, by assembled school 
children. Members of the Medford Welfare Club will assist and will present flags 
to the school children. 

2.00 P. M. — 5.00 P. M. — The Royall House, with its historic collection, Main and George 
Streets, Medford Center, and the Medford Historical Society Building, 10 Governors 
Avenue, Medford Center, and its historical collection, open for inspection by visitors. 
The Royall House, one of the finest Colonial mansions in New England, was headquarters of 
General John Stark during the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. Gen. George 
Washington also visited this famous house during the siege of Boston. 

7.00 P. M. — Ringing of church bells of the city and of the chimes on Goddard Chapel tower, 
Tufts College. 
Annual Ladies' Night of Lawrence Light Guard at Armory. 



THE STORY OF PAUL REVERE'S RIDE. 

(Written by Himself in 1783.) 

' A BOUT ten o'clock (p. m.) Dr. Warren sent in great haste for me, and begged that 

l\ I would immediately set off for Lexington, where Messrs. Hancock and Adams were, 

and acquaint them of the movement, and that it was thought they were the objects. When 

I got to Dr. Warren's house [on the site of the present American House] I found he had sent 

an_express by land to Lexington — a Mr. William Dawes. 

"The Sunday before, by desire of Dr. Warren, I had been to Lexington, to Messrs. Han- 
cock and Adams, who were at the Rev. Mr. Clark's. I returned at night through Charlestown; 
there I had agreed with a Colonel Conant and some other gentlemen, that if the British won 
out by water, we would show two lanthorns in the North Church steeple and if by land, one 
as a signal; for we were apprehensive it would be difficult to cross the Charles River, or get 
over by Boston Neck. 

"I left Dr. Warren, called upon a friend, and desired him to make the signals. I then 
went home, took my boots and surtout, went to the north part of the town, where I kept a 
boat; two friends rowed me across Charles River a little to the eastward where the Somerset 
man-of-war lay. It was then young flood, the ship was winding and the moon rising. They, 

(12) 



landed me on the Charlestown side. When I got into town I met Colonel Conant and several 
others; they said that had seen our signals. I told them what was acting, and went to get 
me a horse; I got a horse of Deacon Larkin. 

"I set off upon a very good horse; it was then about 11 o'clock, and very pleasant. In 
Medford I awaked the captain of the minute men; and that after that, I alarmed almost every 
house, till I got to Lexington 

"After I had been there about half an hour Mr. Dawes arrived, who came from Boston, 
over the neck; we set off for Concord, & were overtaken by a young gentleman named Prescott, 
who belonged to Concord, and was going home; when we had got about half way from Lex- 
ington to Concord the other two stopped at a House to awake the man, I kept along, when I 
got about 200 yards ahead of them; I saw two officers as before, I called to my company to 
come up, saying here was two of them. In an instant I saw four of them, who rode up to me, 
with their pistols in their hands, said 'you stop if you go an inch further, you are a dead Man.' 
Immediately Mr. Prescott came up we attempted to git thro them, but they kept before us, 
and swore if we did not turn into that pasture, they would blow our brains out (they had 
placed themselves opposite to a pair of Barrs and had taken the Barrs down), they forced us 
in, when we got in, Mr. Prescott said put on. He took to the left, I to the right towards a 
wood, at the bottom of the Pasture intending, when I gained that, to jump my Horse, & run 
afoot; just as I reached it, out started six officers, seized my bridle, put their pistols to my 
Breast ordered me to dismount, which I did." — Massachusetts Historical Society docu= 
merits. 



-4 



THE RIDE OF WILLIAM DAWES, JR. 

WILLIAM DAWES, junior, a young tanner, was born in the North End in 1745. He 
was an active patriot with Revere, Dr. Warren and others, a small group in watchful 
waiting for a move of the British against the Americans. 

Warning of such a movement was given them by William Jasper, an Englishman, who 
had married Ann, sister of Robert Newman, the sexton of Christ Church. Jasper was a 
cutler and did work for the soldiers and so heard of the intended expedition. 

Revere crossed the river by boat but Dawes made the journey by land. The only way 
to reach the country north and west of Boston by land, previous to 1785, was over Boston 
Neck, by Washington Street, which continued through Roxbury, Brookline and the towns 
south to Providence. In Brookline, just beyond the village, was a road to the west, Harvard 
Street, which ran through Brighton and crossed the Charles where the Stadium Bridge is located. 

Dawes in his great coat and slouched hat, his usual dress on his rides, would today, after 
leaving the Dudley Street Terminal, ride through Roxbury Street and Eliot Square. Then 
by Tremont Street and Huntington Avenue reach Brookline Square. Turning into Harvard 
Street he would ride by Franklin Street, Brighton, to the bridge. Over the river by Boylston 
Street he enters Harvard Square. The Concord Road, later North Avenue, is the Massa- 
chusetts Avenue of today. By that road he continued through Menotomy, now Arlington, 
to Lexington, where he arrived shortly after Revere. 

During the war Dawes removed with his family to Worcester, where he was Assistant 
Commissary of Issues at the Magazine. 

After the war, from 1781 to 1795, he kept a general store at 13 Dock Square, now numbered 
21 to 30. He lived on Ann, now North Street, where stood the "Franklin House" half a 
century ago. In 1795 he went to live on his farm in Marlboro, where he died 25 Feb. 1799. 
His body is buried in the King's Chapel Burial Ground. 

The site of his home was marked April 19, 1925, by a tablet placed there by the City 
of Boston Committee on Marking Historical Sites. Just how he went from his home to 
the point in Roxbury from which he started his ride is not known. He may have proceeded 
on foot, avoiding as best he could the British sentries posted to prevent just such journeys as 
he was about to make; or he may have gone on horseback earlier in the day over Washington 
Street, through the present South End district, to Roxbury. We do not know; but it appears 
certain that his ride started at the place the committee selected, at John Eliot Square. 

— By W. K. Watkins, Sons of the American Revolution. 

(13) 



LIVING LESSONS IN AMERICANISM 

FROM THE FOUNDERS OF THE NATION 
TO MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN OF 1931. 

Commemorating service to their country by three Messengers of the 
Revolution — Revere, Dawes and Prescott. 

Not so much in honor of these individuals as in honor of the principles 
for which they served — lessons of loyalty, discipline and faithful= 
ness for all true Americans. 



As the 19th of April, 1775, is set down in history and quite well fixed in the minds 
of people generally as the date of the first armed resistance by the future republic 
of the American United States to the short=sighted acts of autocratic government 
officials, so the holiday programs of Patriots' Day, 1931, constitute early and fitting 
observances directly related to the 301st anniversary of the Puritans of the Bay 
Colony whose firm stand for their own independence led directly to the results 
commemorated by Patriots' Day and later in the year by Independence Day. 

PATRIOTS' DAY was first observed as a legal holiday in Massachusetts April 19, 
1894. On that date the "Ride of Paul Revere" was reproduced, taking place 
with historical accuracy at the midnight hour in Medford. 

The present plan for a patriotic and historical observance of "Patriots' Day" was 
inaugurated in 1916, by a committee of the Public Celebrations Association of 
Boston, including the sending of a rider representing PAUL REVERE over the 
original route from Boston to Lexington. 

The event proved so worth while that a joint celebration was proposed in which 
all the towns and cities along the route might officially participate. The plans 
found ready welcome. In each community — Somerville, Medford, Arlington 
and Lexington, as well as Boston — an official committee was sanctioned by 
Mayor or Selectmen for each annual celebration. 



A NEW FEATURE in 1920 was the reproduction of the ride of WILLIAM DAWES, Jr., 
who was sent on the same errand as that which caused the more famous ride 
of Revere. This added feature proved successful. The several communities 
concerned, through their representative committees, have arranged the local 
programs each year: Brookline, Cambridge, Arlington, Lexington and Boston. 

Although the "Ride of Paul Revere" has received more attention in history and 
in the popular mind, the ride of Dawes was equally important and is equally 
deserving of being commemorated. 

THE ORIGINAL RIDE BY REVERE started at Charlestown. He went by boat from 
the Boston shore; but for the purposes of the 1930 reproduction of the historic 
event the rider goes on horseback from the house in North Square in which 
Revere lived in 1775, over Charlestown Bridge. 

THE ORIGINAL DAWES RIDE was by way of the present South End, over the "Neck" 
to Roxbury, then the only land road from Boston. 

LAST YEAR — the Tercentenary Year of 1930 — the important feature of a third 
rider of that night of '75 was commemorated and the ride of Dr. SAMUEL 
PRESCOTT was reproduced as described by Revere. Prescott took up the mes= 
sage from the Boston Safety Committee when the other two riders were inter= 
cepted by the British troops, and going across lots he delivered the word in time 
to save the stores at Concord. 

LAST YEAR, also for the first time, another feature was reproduced in the continuing 
of the ride of the early morning hours of '75 — by an "unknown rider" — from 
Concord to Acton. 

THIS YEAR, at Lexington, is re=enacted the assembling of the Minute Men as 
described in history. 

(14) 



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April Twenty-third, Nineteen Thirty-one 



PROGRAM 



1. Allegro Maestoso 
Romance Sans Parole 

Mr. Camp 



Handel 
Bonnet 



2. Sheep and Lambs 

When the Dew is Falling 

Mrs. Borden 



Homer 
Schneider 



3. To Spring 
Spring Song 
At the Brook 



Grieg 

Mendelssohn 

Boisdeffre 



Wayside Inn Trio 



4. Reverie Dickinson 

Wind in the Pine Trees Clokey 

Humoresque, L'Organo Primitive Yon 

Mr. Camp 



5. What's in the Air Today 

Mrs. Borden 



Eden 



6. Samson et Delila Saint-Saens 

Wayside Inn Trio 



7. 


Largo 




Handel 




Ave Maria 




Gounod 




Mr. Camp and 


Trio 




8. 


Pirere a Notre Dame 




Boellman 




Toccata 




Boellman 




Mr. Camp 







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Stye fflagatte Jntt Saga Sdjonl 

Atfrlgtic (flommtttgg 

Invite You to Attend 

A ifflag Wanting $artg 

TO be given 

§aturftag wetting, fl&ag 2, 1931 

at 8.00 o'clock 
Subscription 75 cents Number j 7Q 

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■jJrograntttt? 

ORCHESTRAL SELECTION 

Merry Widow Selection — Lehar 

Grand March (8.15) 

Quadrille 

Waltz 

Spanish Circle 

SPECIALTY 

Waltz 

Badger Gavotte 

ORCHESTRAL SELECTION 

Victor Herbert Favorites 

Polka Mazurka 

Waltz (Specialty) 

Virginia Reel 

Duchess 

PRESENTATION OF THE MINUET OF 

COLONIAL DAYS 

Waltz Medley 

Shade of the Old Apple Tree 
Mary Had a Little Lamb 
Auld Lang Syne 
Home Sweet Home 

Music by Four Piece Orchestra 

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ON 




A M E. R I C A. N 



2Q.DQQ.000TH 



Gov. Joseph B. Ely and the ex- 
ecutive council examined the 20,- 
000.000th Ford car which stopped 
at the State House today in its 
150.000-mile tour of the. country. 

This car was driven from the 
assemly rooms in Detroit by Henry 
Ford April 14. Gov. Ely *»t a( the 
wheel ajid later looked over the 
engine and various parts, which 
were explained by Charles Essin- 
ser. New England district manager 
for the Ford Company. 

The machine was taken onto the 
sidewalk in front of the main en- 
trane to the State House. Its driv- 
er was C. J. Hilton. With him 
were Factory Representatives R 
J. Hilton. R. J. Sennott, Jack Les- 
ter and O. S. Randall. 




Wg.u.,MaV J.3.JLS34. 



The 20,000,000th Ford car. now 
I on a country-wide tour, during 
| which it will visit every state in 
the Union and travel about 15,000 
miles, arrived in Boston yesterday 
shortly after noon. It was driven 
to the Beacon st. entrance to the 
State House, where it and C. A. 
Efslinger, Ford branch manager 
and members of the staff were of- 
ficially welcomed by Governor Ely 
tiid members of his council. 

Following an inspection of the 
car, during which he sat in the 
driver's seat, Governor Ely in- 
scribed his name in the log of 
' The Twenty Millionth Ford, ' 
v hich already contains the signa- 
ture of hundreds of dignitaries in 
other states already visited by the 
car. 

Assembled in the presence of 
Henry and Edsel Ford the 20,000,- 
000th Ford left the Ford Motor 
Company's Rouge plant in Dear- 
born, Mich., on April 14. When it 
completes its tour it. is to be pre- 
served with other famous automo- 
biles jn Greenfield Village, near 
Dearborn. Henry Ford's reproduc- 
tion of an early American Villa 

Before leaving Boston the car 
visited the' many Ford agencies in 
the metropolitan district. 

THu«s.,rvlAv 14-, 1931. 










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Eosionians looking up at the 
air defense manervers today saw: 

Five hundred and eight-five 
trrtical planes. 

The entire strength of the Army 
Air Corps. 

Equipment that cost $20,000,000. 
The flying personnel of 1400 avi 
ators and mechanics. 

The climax of a, demonstra- 
tion that cost $3,000,000. • 

Some of the greatest pilots in 
world. 

The longest aerial review ever 
held in the history of world 
aeronautics. 

Combat maneuvers at 200 miles 
an hour. 

Bombers that could dump 100.- 
003 pounds of explosives on Bos- 
ton, blowing it to bits. 

Attack planes with four ma- 
chine gima and fragmentation 
bombs onoug-ii to v.teck a troop 
train. 

And the greatest air maneuvers 
he'd in peace or v/ar times 



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Cream of Local 

Horses Seek 

Prizes 

The Millwood Hunt opened its 
gates at 10:15 today for its ninth 
annual show on the beautiful es- 
tate of Reginald W. Bird in Fram- 
ingham. 




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Phenomenon 

Proves to 

Be Sun 

A peculiar globular object ap- 
peared in the sky over Boston to- 
day and blinked the eyes of startled 
spectators. 

Older residents described it as 
"Sun," an astral body capable of 
giving warmth. 

Its appearance was clocked in 
4 2-5 seconds by Thomas F. Phelan, 
weather change expert, befor.' 
clouds obscured it again. 

Later it reappeared, and for the 
rest of the day dodged in and out. 

According to Phelan's records, it 
was the first public appearance at 
Old Sol since Sunday. 

Seriously, the storm is over, offi- 
cially reported so by the weather 

man. 

Heavy rains were it ported out to 
sea, but the storm was movina that 
way and will h? replaced by fair 
| weather tonight an4 tomorrow. 

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ayside Inn 

THE furnishings of Wayside Inn provide in themselves 
an interesting chronicle of earlier days. Among 
them are various pieces mentioned in Longfellow's 
"Tales." The grandfather's clock and the picture of 
the Princess Mary were in the original tavern when it 
was owned by the Howe family. 

Two other classes of furnishings are to be found in the 
Inn. There are the furnishings brought into the house by 
Edward R. Lemon. Mr. Lemon was truly a "life-saver" at 
an uncertain period in the history of the Inn. He bought it 
from the Howe heirs in 1896. It is said that Mr. Lemon saw 
an article concerning the Inn written by Edwin Mead for 
the New England Magazine. He later wrote to Mr. Mead, 
"That old Wayside Inn and my furniture ought to go to- 
gether. I wondered if the old place could be bought at 
any reasonable price, and I went up to see. I bought it 
and am moving up my furniture." 

Thus after nearly thirty years the Inn assumed a new 
lease of life. Edward Lemon had a keen appreciation and 
reverence for Longfellow together with a thorough knowl- 
edge of early Americana. He brought into the house many 
interesting and appropriate pieces. Among them, standing 
in a corner of the parlor, is an Hepplewhite desk, owned 
and used by Daniel Webster. It is a bureau type of desk. 
The top, made to look like a drawer, pulls out and forms a 
convenient writing desk. 

Then there are the furnishings added by Mr. Ford. These 
completely restore the atmosphere of a homey old inn. 
Many little objects put about here and there are interesting 
as well as typical of early New England. Candlesticks of 
pewter, iron and tin; little grease Betty lamps, whale oil 
lamps, and rush holders typify the means of artificial light 
in the old days. 

Old hooked rugs on the floors and early engravings and 
prints on the walls also give to the house a homelike aspect. 
A guest remarked one day that the Inn was so very much 
like a home that he almost felt as if he were intruding! 
And besides the little things, Mr. Ford {Concluded onpage is) 
has added many tables, chairs, beds, chests, et cetera, of 
various types, all blending into the general antique plan 
of the house.. 



7v£ote Revolutionary relics over fireplace on right ; also 
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The history of the Inn is simple and unique it, , 

had three owners three sources from which the furnishing 

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GRADUATION WEEK 



EXERCISES 



June 14-20, 1931 





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SUNDAY, JUNE 14 

Morning : 

PICNIC AT LAKE ROHUNTA IN ATHOL 

Cars leave Wayside Inn at 9;00 A. M. 

Evening : 

GET TOGETHER ON SINGING HILL 

(near underpass on new state road) 

On returning from the picnic there will be a Get Together and Sing on 
Singing Hill at 6:00 P. M. Further information with reference to the picnic 
or sing may be obtained from Mr. Young at the Boys School. 

MONDAY, JUNE IS 

Morning : 

TRIP TO FRANKLIN PARK 

Redstone School Children 

Evening: 

CLASS DINNER 

Boys School 



MENU 

Ripe Olives Stuffed Celery 

Mint Leaf Cocktail 

Encarpus Salad 

Spring Vegetable Soup 

Native Roast Duckling with Maryland Cranberries 

Home grown Peas Artichokes 

Mushrooms 



SPEAKING PROGRAMME 

Master of Ceremonies 

Charles Barkhouse 
Class Will 

Earl Stoddard 
Class Prophecy ■> 

George Hill 
Class History 



Louis Seligman 
:sh Strawberry Ice Cream Cocoanut Puffs Valedictory Address 

Milk Cocoa William Bridges 

Tickets for Class Dinner may be obtained from any of the Senior Boys 



TUESDAY, JUNE 16 



Morning: 

TRIP TO BOSTON AND LEXINGTON 

Southwest School Children 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17 

Morning: 

TREE PLANTING BY SENIOR BOYS 

Boys School 

Afternoon : 

DANCING PARTY AT WAYSIDE INN AT 2:30 P. M. 

Redstone and Southwest School Children 

Evening : 

GRADUATION 

Boys School 
Exercises to be held at Wayside Inn at 8:00 P. M. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 18 

Morning : 

TREE PLANTING BY FOURTH GRADE 

Redstone School 

Afternoon : 

TREE PLANTING BY EIGHTH GRADE 

Southwest School 

Evening : 

GRADUATION PLAY 

Boys School 
Tickets may be obtained from any member of the senior class 



FRIDAY, JUNE 19 

Evening: 

PLAYS AND GRADUATION 

. Redstone and Southwest Schools 



REDSTONE SCHOOL PLAY 
When the Sun Stayed in Bed 



SOUTHWEST SCHOOL PLAY 

Evangeline 



To be held at The Wayside Inn at 8:00 P. M. 



SATURDAY, JUNE 20 



Morning and Afternoon : 
FIELD DAY 



All Schools 



Programme 
8:30—10:00 TRACK EVENTS • 

Running broad jump 440 yard run 

Running high jump Three-legged race 

100 yard dash Wheelbarrow race 

SO yard dash Balloon blowing contest 

Relay race Over and under relay 

Finals of Horseshoe Pitching Tournament 

10:00—11:00 FINALS OF TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

11:00—11:30 BICYCLE RACE 

1:30—3:30 BASEBALL GAME 

Wayside Inn Boys School Team vs. Faculty 

3:4s_4:30 boxing and wrestling 
4:40—5:00 tug of war 

Evening : 

SENIOR BALL 

Formal by Invitation 



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34th ANNUAL CONVENTION 



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WAYSIDE INN - - - SUDBURY 



TUESDAY - JUNE 16th 



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PROGRAM 



THE SUMMER DAYS ARE COME AGAIN 



Bugle Call Assembly- 

Mr. Bushnell 



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Songs Summer Days are Come Again 

Assembly 



Presentation of Tree 

Michael Bole ski 



Songs • Trees 



Earl Stoddard 



Planting 



Thomas Margellar 



Acceptance of Tree 

Thomas Hogaft 



Closing Songs Blest Be The Tie That 

Binds 

Assembly 



The summer days are come again, 

Vdth sun and clouds between, 

And, fed alike by sun end rain, 

The trees -grow broad and green: 

Spread^; broad and green the leafy tent* 

Upon whose grassy floor 

Our feet, too long in cities pent, 

Their freedom find once more. 

The summer days are come again $ 

Once more the glad earth yields 

Her golden wealth of ripping grain; 

And breath of clover fields, 

And deep ! ning ah&de of summer woods, 

And glov; of summer air, 

And winging tho ! ts, and happy moods 

Of love and joy and prayer. 

The summer days are come again) 

The birds are on the wings 

God's praises, in their loving* strain, 

Unconsciously they sing; 

\;e know who giveth all the good 

That doth our cup o T er-briin, 

For summer joy in field and wood 

V.e lift our song to Him. 

Amen. 






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GRADUATION 



VV ednesday Evening, June 17th, 1931 
eight o clock 



Wayside Inn 



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PROGRAM 



PROCESSIONAL— March from Athalia 



Mendelssohn 



INVOCATION 



Rev. Spurgeon M. Hirtle 



MUSICAL SELECTION 



Prelude 



Rachmaninoff 



REMARKS 



Mr. Campbell 



musical selection- 
Henry the Eighth Suite 

BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS 

Rev. T. Everett Fairchild 
Boston University 



Edivard German 



MUSICAL SELECTION 



Indian Lament 



Dvorak 



PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES 

Mr. E. J. Boyer 
Miss Betty Boyer 



AMERICA 



School and Guests 



BENEDICTION (audience please rise) 

Rev. Spurgeon M. Hirtle 

RECESSIONAL MARCH— Stabat Mater Rossini 

(audience will please remain standing during recessional) 



THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1931 



Charles Barkhous'e 
Michael Bolesky 
William Bridges 
George Hill 



Thomas Margeller 
Joseph Ochedowski 
Louis Seligman 
Earl Stoddard 



AMERICA 



My country, 'tis of thee, 

Sweet land of liberty, 

Of thee I sing. 

Land where my fathers died! 

Land of the Pilgrim's pride! 

From ev'ry mountain side, 

Let freedom ring. 



My native country, thee, 
Land of the noble free, 
Thy name I love. 
I love thy rocks and rills, 
Thy woods and templed hills; 
My heart with rapture thrills 
Like that above. 



Our father's God, to Thee, 

Author of liberty, 

To Thee we sing. 

Long may our land be bright 

With freedom's holy light; 

Protect us by Thy might, 

Great God, our King. 



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PROGRAM 



Song: God, Our Father 



Song: Joy to the June- 
Entire School 



Recitation: Trees Joyce Kilmer 

Entire School 



History of Redstone School 

Wilfred Spiller 
David Bentley 
Betty Doyer 



Recitation: 



Entire School 

What Do We Plant? 

Henry Abbey 
Alvin Bradshaw 
Joyce Belcher 

Allan Bowry 



Essays Famous Trees 



Mary Bar tie tt 



Recitations 



Mary Had a Little hmb 
Bradley V*ay 
Caroline ftay 
Vdlbert Tiriie 



Troo Planting Ceremony 



Grade IV 



Maypole Dance 



Entire School 




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PROGRAM 
Mfrch of the Classes 

Tree Presentation and Planting 
Esther Miller 
Madeline Torrey 

Song; "Trees" 



Class Prophecy of 1931 
Virginia Ellas 
Virginia Bowry 

Songs "School Days" 



Class Will of i93x 

Esther Miller 
Madeline Torrey 



Maypole Dance 

History of 1930 - 1931 

John kinship 

Inspection of Southwest School 

Hurdling 



Baseball Game 

i? The Girls" 

vs 
"The Boys" 



Cheering - Led by 

Ralph Stone 
Thomas Van ship 



Songs "Now the Day is Over" 



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The Boys and Faculty of the 
WAYSIDE INN BOYS SCHOOL 



Present 



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TOMMY" 



A Comedy in 3 Acts 

BY 

Howard Lindsay and Bertrand Robinson 



Civic League Auditorium, Framingham 
Thursday Evening, June 18, at 8:15 o'clock 



Produced by special arrangement with Walter H. Baker. 



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THE CAST 

(in the order in which they speak) 



Mrs. Wilson Marion Allen 

Marie Alice Boyer 

Bernard Thomas Hogan 

Mrs. Thurber : Anne Dickerson 

Willie Wilson John Clark 

Mr. Thurber Robert Clark 

David Tuttle Roger Bristol 

Tommy Mills William Bridges 

Judge Wilson Joseph Ochedowski 



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TIME 

The Present. 



SCENES 



Act. I. 



The living room at the Thurber home- 
Early Evening. 



Act. II. The same — Two days later. 
Act. III. The same — One hour later. 



USHERS— Mrs. Poole, Miss DeMille, George Hill, Louis Seligman. 

ORCHESTRA— Miss Monahan, violin; Miss Ward, cello; Miss 
Doucot, piano; Miss Hobart, flute; Mr. Bushnell, trumpet; Mr. 
Clifford, drums. 

FURNITURE used in this play by courtesy of the Avery Furniture 

Company of Framingham. 



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SCHOOLS 



Graduation Exercises 



Friday Evening, June 19th, 1931 



Eight o'clock 



Wayside Inn 



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Redstone School Play 



'WHEN THE SUN STAYED IN BED' 



by Doris Holsworth 



Characters 

Sun DAVID BENTLEY 

Lavender Cloud BETTY BOYER 

Rosy Cloud MARY BARTLETT 

Golden Cloud JOYCE BELCHER 

White Cloud EMMA BATCHELDER 

Little Stars ALVIN BRADSHAW; 

LYDIA BONAZZOLI; WILBERT TIGHE; 
CAROLINE WAY; BRADLEY WAY 

Mary Shadow FAY BARNARD 

Johnny Shadow ALLAN BOWRY 

Lark WILFRED SPILLER 

Honey Bee JAMES GEEHAN 

Scene: — The Sun's bedroom in his golden palace. 
Time: — Before sunrise. 



Southwest School Play 



'EVANGELINE OF ACADIE" 



Characters 

Voice of Acadie ELEANOR STONE 

The Narrator THOMAS WINSHIP 

Benedict Bellefontaine ROBERT SPILLER 

Evangeline YVETTE HARRINGTON 

Gabriel La Jeunesse RALPH STONE 

Basil IVAN STONE 

Father Felician PARKER BARTLETT 

Rene Le Blanc JOHN WINSHIP 

Coralie . ESTHER MILLER 

Rosalie MADELINE TORREY 

Emmalie VIRGINIA BOWRY 

Scene 1 ; Act I. Front room in the home of Benedict 
Bellefontaine. 

Scene 2 ; Act I. Same — a week later. 

Scene 1 ; Act II. A room at the Mission many years later. 

Scene 2; Act II. The Anteroom of the Almshouse. 



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Graduation Program for 
Southwest School and Redstone School 



CLASS POEM 



Southwest School 



RECITATION— In the Looking Glass— Leonard 

Redstone School 

SONG— Oh Worship the King 

Southwest School 

RECITATION— Vespers— Milne 

Redstone School 



Madeline Torrey 
Betty Boyer 



David Bentley 



RECITATION— The Land of Story Books— Stevenson Wilfred Spiller 

Redstone School 

RHYTHMIC BAND SELECTION— 

Battle Call and March of the Warriors — Harris 

Redstone School and Wayside Inn Trio 

Triangle — Betty Boyer Sand Blocks — Allan Bowry 

Tambourine — David Bentley Cymbals — Mary Bartlett 

Castanets — Joyce Belcher Drum — Wilfred Spiller 

Mary Bartlett 



RECITATION— The Duel— Field 

Redstone School 



ESSAYS— Thoughts 



Esther Miller 



Southwest School 



SONG — America, the Beautiful — Bates 

Southwest and Redstone Schools 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

Miss Hopkins 

SONG— Village Chimes 

Southwest and Redstone Schools 



Members of the Graduating Classes 

Southwest School 
Esther Virginia Miller Madeline Mary Torrey 

Redstone School 
Mary Philena Bartlett David Harry Bentley 

Mildred Elsbeth Boyer Wilfred Alphus Spiller 



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JUNE 20, 1931 



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WATSIDE INN 

J^uncheon 

FRIDAY, JUNE 26 

Ladies Only 

Leaving Hotel Statler 
Columbus Avenue Entrance, 10 a. m. 



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